Minority Mental Health

Resource Guide

         

July is Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, and we are using our national platform - and our research, education and advocacy work - to help elevate voices, to listen and better understand, and to support the unique needs and range of experiences of underrepresented racial and ethnic groups. 

As a health organization, AFSP is dedicated to addressing the mental health and suicide prevention needs among minority populations. We are committed to a process of change knowing that long-term, sustained efforts are needed to improve access to culturally informed, evidence-based quality mental health care. We will continue to speak out about the inequities across many aspects of society, especially related to access to healthcare for underrepresented communities, and to advocate for ending these disparities.

We know that there is much work to do, and that’s why AFSP has made new commitments to:

  • Reflect, learn, and improve upon our own organizational diversity and inclusion.
  • Prioritize diverse communities, believing that every family, youth, adult and community should have the resources and knowledge to discuss mental health concerns, connect with support, and have access to effective mental health care and suicide prevention resources, as outlined in our three-year strategic plan.
  • Stimulate and fund research related to minority communities, health disparities and inequities with the support of AFSP’s Scientific Council. This will include a priority on these research areas as well as on funding researchers from underrepresented backgrounds. 
  • Enter into a partnership with the National Latino Behavioral Health Association to collaboratively advance Latino suicide prevention. Our organizations will work together to support programs, campaigns, training, workforce development and other initiatives on mental health and suicide prevention in the Latino community.
  • Convene leading experts in minority mental health and suicide prevention through a Town Hall series to engage in education, advocacy and public understanding to close the gap and ensure we are working to better understand and meet the needs of diverse communities.

We all have a role to play, and invite individuals, communities, organizations and thought leaders to join us in our efforts to create long-lasting changes in mental health equity and to prevent suicide among underrepresented communities.

 

Resources for Black and African American Communities

Black Emotional and Mental Health Collective is a collective of advocates, yoga teachers, artists, therapists, lawyers, religious leaders, teachers, psychologists and activists committed to the emotional/mental health and healing of Black communities. They envision a world where there are no barriers to Black healing. Their mission is to remove the barriers that Black people experience getting access to or staying connected with emotional health care and healing. They do this through education, training, advocacy and the creative arts. On Instagram @_beamorg.

Black Girls Smile's vision is of a society that focuses on ensuring all young African American females receive the resources and support necessary to lead mentally healthy lives.

The Boris Lawrence Henson Foundation’s vision is to eradicate the stigma around mental health issues in the African-American community.

Untreated mental illness can also make African American men more vulnerable to substance abuse, homelessness, incarceration, and homicide. Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., and NIMHD have launched Brother, You’re on My Mind: Changing the National Dialogue Regarding Mental Health Among African American Men, an initiative to help start conversations about mental health. Find additional information or download their toolkit.

Lee Thompson Young Foundation - Envisions a world in which mental illness is recognized by all as a treatable, biopsychosocial disorder and the stigma associated with it no longer exists; a world that supports and encourages wholeness and well being at every stage of life. They focus on mental health education for African American communities.

The Loveland Foundation - is committed to showing up for communities of color in unique and powerful ways, with a particular focus on Black women and girls. Our resources and initiatives are collaborative and they prioritize opportunity, access, validation, and healing. We are becoming the ones we’ve been waiting for. On Instagram @thelovelandfoundation.

Therapy for Black Girls is an online space dedicated to encouraging the mental wellness of Black women and girls. On Instagram @therapyforblackgirls.

Therapy for Black Men understands that finding the right therapist can often be a lengthy and challenging process, and Black men may not know where to begin. Determining what kind of therapist is best suited for treating a particular issue is not the easiest of tasks. TherapyForBlackMen.org is a directory to help men of color in their search for a therapist. Using the directory, men can search by therapist location and specialization. Searching by location, the results will include the therapists near you and will display their credentials, location, and the issues they treat. At TherapyForBlackMen.org, men will also find a wide range of resources aimed at helping them in their search for a multiculturally-competent therapist.

 

Resources for Asian and Pacific Islander Communities

 

Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum influences policy, mobilizes communities, and strengthens programs and organizations to improve the health of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. APIAHF envisions a world where all people share responsibility and take action to ensure healthy and vibrant communities for current and future generations.

Asian Mental Health Collective's mission is to raise awareness about the importance of mental health care, promote emotional well-being, and challenge the stigma concerning mental illness amongst Asian communities globally.

South Asian Mental Health Alliance is a new non-profit community network engaging, educating and mobilizing the BC South Asian community around issues related to mental health. On Instagram @southasianmentalhealthalliance.

 

Resources for Latinx and Hispanic Communities

National Alliance for Hispanic Health works to ensure that health incorporates the best of science, culture, and community. They achieve this by listening to the individual, investing in leading community based organizations, working with national partners, examining and improving the resources and systems available, and designing solutions to make health a part of each person’s life. They continually work to improve the quality of care and its availability to all. 

The National Latino Behavioral Health Association (NLBHA) was established to fill a need for a unified national voice for Latino populations in the behavioral health arena and to bring attention to the great disparities that exist in areas of access, utilization, practice based research and adequately trained personnel.

Comunilife’s unique Life is Precious™/La Vida es Preciosa program prevents suicide in young Latinas – the teen population with the highest rate of suicide attempt in the country.  Life is Precious™ combines individual and group counseling, arts therapy, academic support, and nutritional and fitness activities. Psychiatric services are provided by partnering clinics.

Founded in 1974, MANA, A National Latina Organization® (MANA) is a national grassroots membership organization with chapters, individual members and affiliates across the country. MANA represents the interests of Latina women, youth and families on issues that impact our communities. MANA contributes the leading Latina voice on many of the major issues in the  public sphere, particularly in the areas of education, health and well-being, financial literacy, equal and civil rights, and immigration reform.

National Alliance for Hispanic Health works to ensure that health incorporates the best of science, culture, and community. They achieve this by listening to the individual, investing in leading community based organizations, working with national partners, examining and improving the resources and systems available, and designing solutions to make health a part of each person’s life. They continually work to improve the quality of care and its availability to all. 

The National Latino Behavioral Health Association (NLBHA) was established to fill a need for a unified national voice for Latino populations in the behavioral health arena and to bring attention to the great disparities that exist in areas of access, utilization, practice based research and adequately trained personnel.

SanaMente/Each Mind Matters is California’s mental health movement. They are millions of individuals and thousands of organizations working to advance mental health. They offer a website full of culturally focused info on mental health in Spanish.

Therapy for Latinx is a new online database that makes it easy for Latinx people to find mental health professionals in their own communities. Therapy For Latinx is easy to use for both mental health professionals and people seeking mental health treatment. If you are looking for the therapist, you can search the database via state, or add keywords if you are searching for a special focus. For Latinx therapists who want to be included in the database, the listing form is simple and straightforward. The resource is also available in both English and Spanish, and, what's more, Therapy For Latinx offers free online mental health screenings in partnership with Mental Health America. On Instagram @therapyforlatinx.

 

Resources for Native and Indigenous Communities

The Center for Native American Youth believes all Native American youth should lead full and healthy lives, have equal access to opportunity, and draw strength from their culture and one another. As a policy program, they work to improve the health, safety, and overall well-being of Native American youth through youth recognition, inspiration and leadership; research, advocacy, and policy change; and by serving as a national resource exchange.